amazon uk ugg boots the Heuer Autavia and the story of the world’s first chronograph

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Recently, we featured a watch, a nice watch, in the Sept. 16 print issue of Autoweek as part of our coverage of Ron Howard’s “Rush.” We mentioned that it was a Heuer Autavia and that it was from the 1970s, but like most things that fit in a blurb, the story behind it is far more compelling. Because like Paul Newman’s Rolex Daytona and Steve McQueen’s Heuer Monaco you know, that other Heuer 1960s Formula One driver Jo Siffert joins the unusual gang of race car drivers forever intertwined with a wristwatch.

1968 was a big year for both Heuer and Siffert. It was the year that Heuer, working with Breitling, introduced the world’s first automatic chronograph, the culmination of a fierce battle against Seiko and Zenith that began almost a decade earlier. And it was the year that Siffert won two endurance races for Porsche, in the 907, while also securing a victory at his first Formula One race: the British Grand Prix at Brands Hatch, deemed “the last genuine privateer victory in F1.”

“Seppi,” as he was known, was both a modest man and a natural salesman. “Siffert wouldn’t let me go home until he sold me a Porsche 911,” recalled Jack Heuer, the company’s president. As the story goes, Siffert would persuade his fellow drivers to buy Heuer watches even while on the grid, waiting for the race to start. He had wound his way across racing in the hardscrabble way many of us might be familiar with: He took odd jobs; he fixed his own cars and motorcycles; he lived on the road and slept under the stars. “They spent the nights in the cheapest hotels, very often in a farmhouse,” says one account. “Instead of having regular meals, Siffert and his small team tried to deaden their hunger by smoking some cigarettes.”

How romantic! How utterly deserving from the mild mannered driver from Switzerland who was so good at pushing Heuers (as well as the occasional Porsche) that by the start of the 1970s, almost everyone involved in F1 ended up with a Heuer of some sort. Jack Heuer, understandably, was delighted.

“Jo, as you may know from his background, was a very poor guy and he was a born ‘wheeler and dealer,'” said Heuer. “And he would always have a collection of watches, and he would place them with all of his friends on the circuit, and we didn’t mind of course because it was in public. And so if you looked around the Formula One circuit, they all wore a Heuer Chronograph!”

The “Autavia” name was a reflection of its racing and aviation qualities, resurrecting a name last used for dashboard timers. Siffert’s white dialed wristwatch was far and away the rarest Autavia hell, if you smoked Viceroy cigarettes and clipped out a coupon, you could buy yourself a red and black model on the cheap. The movement itself was called “Chronomatic,” a sufficiently futuristic name. Everything was automatic back then, announced with suggestions of a joyous and optimistic future. Datomatic! Gyromatic! Kingmatic! Powermatic!

Jo Siffert Heuer Autavia Caliber 11 Chronomatic:The Chronomatic Caliber 11 movement that changed the world. Of watches, anyway. Photo credit: On The Dash

The watch lent to us for Autoweek’s recent “Rush” photoshoot came from the personal collection of James Lamdin, the urbane, Porsche 912 driving founder of watch broker analog/shift. Upon hearing our cries for help, he airmailed us his personal Autavia Reference from New York City, braving time, distance and Postal Service alike. Lamdin founded analog/shift a year ago, stemming from a passion for watches he discovered 10 years ago when his grandfather died.

“We were very close, but he was tight lipped about the past,” said Lamdin. “He served in the war and did some incredible things about his life, and he didn’t talk about it too much. When he passed, he left behind a collection of nice things.

“It was a near overnight transformation for me. I went from wearing sneakers, cargo shorts and wearing a quartz watch, to caring about nice shoes and better fitting clothes and a vintage watch. It was in honor of my grandfather.”

Lamdin bought his Siffert Autavia from a friend who, for one reason or another, owed him a favor.

“I stole mine,” he said. “Mine is the manual winding, 3 register Siffert dial. The thing about my watch is that it’s more rare than the ‘more desirable’ Caliber 11 Automatic. Mine is considerably more rare. If you talk to a watch nerd, if you want a real accurate chronograph, you want a manual wind.”

Siffert himself wore a Chronomatic Caliber 11, which are few and far between. It used the world’s first automatic chronograph movement developed jointly by Heuer and Breitling a watch that was announced with eager fanfare on March 3, 1969, followed literally minutes later by the repair of the world’s first automatic chronograph movement.

Jo Siffert Heuer Autavia:Jo Siffert, shown here looking cooler than you and I combined. Photo credit: Jo Siffert: Live Fast Die Young

Jo Siffert died on the very track that brought him glory: In 1971, at Brands Hatch, his BRM P160 caught on fire, Siffert unable to escape. It was later ruled that he died from smoke inhalation, that the fire extinguishers at Hawthorn Bend didn’t work, and that the track workers just couldn’t reach him in time. “Fire takes away any reason, any common sense,” Mario Andretti once said. More than 50,000 people attended his funeral in his hometown of Fribourg, Switzerland. Sweeping safety regulations, including better fire suits and on board fire extinguishers, followed.

These days, one can find a Siffert Autavia for not too much (Chronomatics will run a bit more). Jerry Seinfeld did. And while the cost of a 1970s historic Heuer might cause Porsche 911 3.2 owners to blanche, a Viceroy Autavia from the same period can be had for far less. analog/shift has one, in fact.

Compare that to the average price of a genuine Newman Daytona one recently set a record for Rolex Daytona prices when it sold for approximately $500,000 or the cost of a Tag Heuer McQueen Monaco, and a reissue at that. The genuine item will cost a fair bit more than both. It may be a bit silly to suggest that Siffert’s memory lives on through a mere timepiece. But an instrument of precision, designed to perform under extenuating circumstances, and one whose meticulous accuracy and complex function is so vital to the sport, makes for an appropriate tribute to a F1 legend.

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UPDATE: On Nov. 22, 2017, Larry Nassar pleaded guilty to seven counts of first degree criminal sexual conduct, a day after Olympic gold medalist Gabby Douglasidentified herself as yet another alleged victim of the former USA Gymnastics team doctor. On Dec. They train hard, usually from a very young age, they dedicate their lives to competing and they’ll spend every day after turning 30 fighting the notion that they’re “past their prime.” More and more these days we’re hearing about eating disorders, the pressure to use performance enhancing drugs and struggles with depression and anxiety.

Women’s gymnastics is a sport that’s notoriously hard on the body and for the most part they have an unusually small window of peak performance and marketability, and are done competing at the most elite levels past the age of 22.

Which means, basically, that to call them “women” half the time is a stretch. They’re basically girls. Or they certainly started out as girls. Children.

But at the end of the day, they’re kids, competing for a handful of spots that open up every four years for their sport’s biggest stage Summer Olympics running themselves ragged in between for regional, national and international competition. There’s also a choice to be made when it comes to remaining eligible to compete in college and going pro. Gymnasts can’t do both.

“It’s kind of a bummer,” Jordyn Wieber, who went pro after high school and won team gold with Douglas at the 2012 Summer Olympics but therefore couldn’t compete as a student at UCLA afterward, told NBC Sports last year. “Gymnastics should be the exception. It’s too bad girls can’t do both because gymnastics is so unique.”

Every single athlete has a story, a journey that led them to the pros, to the big stage, to what will hopefully include some kind of glory but either way, is a place to be proud of. Some stories are more inundated with struggles than others, but no sporting triumph is without a battle behind it it more public or a deeply personal one.

So it’s all the more heartbreaking to hear about instances when the system that in theory should be looking out for the best interests of young athletes at all times, especially when they’re children, fails them so completely.

Aly Raisman on Friday became the latest and most famous gymnast to come forward as an alleged victim of Dr. Larry Nassar, the former doctor for USA Gymnastics who stands accused of molesting more than 140 people and is set to go on trial in December on 22 counts of criminal sexual conduct in the first degree for allegedly assaulting nine girls between the ages of 10 and 15 while under the guise of providing medical treatment or routine physical examinations. He’s facing the possibility of life in prison.

At 18, Raisman was a member of the “Fierce Five” who won team and individual gold, plus a bronze, at the 2012 Summer Olympics and emerged as the most decorated American gymnast of the Games; last year she competed in Rio de Janeiro as the veteran 22 year old team captain of the “Final Five,” winning two individual silvers and another team gold.

Last month Raisman’s 2012 teammate McKayla Maroney alleged that Nassar had abused her as well dating back to 2009, when she was 13. Maroney wrote on social media that she was encouraged to come forward by the numerous women who were speaking up about sexual harassment and assault in Hollywood, as she rightfully even more presciently than she could have imagined that mistreatment of women and children was hardly a scourge endemic to show business. “100% support you. SO proud of you and your strength. Love you like a sister!!”

As it turns out, she had talked to the FBI about Nassar not long after Rio.

“Why are we looking at why didn’t the girls speak up? Why not look at what about the culture?” Raisman, who also opens up about the alleged abuse in her upcoming book, Fierce, said in an interview with 60 Minutes scheduled to air Sunday. “What did USA Gymnastics do, and Larry Nassar do, to manipulate these girls so much that they are so afraid to speak up?”

As a piece of the criminal complaint (obtained by the Los Angeles Times) filed against Nassar in February reads, Victim B referring to an accuser who wished to remain anonymous: “Victim B stated that she and all the gymnasts trusted Nassar and that he was like a god to the gymnasts. Because it was happening to all of them, they thought it was normal.”

Nassar was a member of the faculty of Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine, where he had his practice, and had been affiliated with Indianapolis based USA Gymnastics since 1986, serving as team doctor at four Olympics.

Once again, the culture of silence and intimidation that exists to keep the powerful and successful in power and those who rely on them feeling vulnerable, is hardly particular to any one business. If anyone wasn’t aware before, the past month has been a crash course in just how ugly it can be out there for women in entertainment, media, politics, sports, restaurants, tech, finance much anywhere men outnumber women. At the same time, though one quick search of the Internet shows that it’s a conversation that’s been waiting to be had out in the open for years, we’re finally starting to get a handle on how many boys have also suffered at the hands of grown men, boys who have since grown up and are only now finding an environment more conducive to sharing their stories.

Not to mention sharing the stories with the possibility of results.

Nassar has pleaded not guilty to the 22 molestation charges, which were filed in February. In July he pleaded guilty to federal child pornography charges in an unrelated case, for which he’s due to be formally sentenced next month. Meanwhile, Nassar has been behind bars since being arrested last December. And I think, it just disgusts me he was a doctor. It’s crazy. Because when a doctor says something you want to believe him, and it’s just awful.”

Tiffany Thomas Lopez, a former Michigan State softball player who’s suing Nassar and the university, alleging she was abused by the doctor at least 10 times starting in 1998 and her school did nothing when she reported him, told NBC News last December that a supervisor she told in 2000 disregarded her claims.

“She says, ‘He’s a world renowned doctor. He treats elite athletes, athletes just like yourself,'” Lopez, whose lawyer was also representing two gymnasts, recalled. “It was basically need to be grateful you are getting this treatment. She made me feel like I was crazy.”

Nassar remained employed by Michigan State until September 2016, once dozens of alleged victims had come forward with complaints and almost a year after USA Gymnastics fired him.

The school told NBC News in December that USAG did not tell them about the “athlete concerns” that prompted them to report Nassar to the FBI in 2015. MSU said one complaint had previously been filed against Nassar in 2014, after which they imposed certain restrictions on his employment following an internal investigation into sexual misconduct. “There was no reason based on those investigations to remove Nassar from the staff,” a school spokesperson said. “However, based on the investigation, we did feel it was prudent to reinforce with Nassar the proper protocols for certain medical procedures.”

While both Maroney and Raisman had stories to tell when the allegations against Nassar first came to light, it’s ultimately up to when a woman feels most ready to come forward. And that isn’t necessarily when everyone else is doing it, in court or in a public forum.

There’s no exact explanation for why one time is better than another for a sea change, but plenty of theories abound as to why now has seemingly become the time for holding nothing back being the belief that the outcome of last year’s presidential election put the final nail in the coffin of women’s tolerance of men not only getting away with things, but with being rewarded despite being accused of unacceptable behavior.

Raisman and Maroney’s experience is a fairly unique to sports situation, however, in which there was no way out of working with a specific governing body Gymnastics order to achieve their Olympic dreams. There is no other route to take,
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“New Zealand company Nutralife categorises this product as ‘Women’s Health’ and says it’s to help ‘reduce melanin production’. What are the health benefits of reduced melanin, other than if you’re whiter you’ll probably get better healthcare?” asks a reader.

The finer points of mansplaining Mansplaining is not simply men explaining stuff to women, it’s men assuming women couldn’t possibly know about a certain subject and talking over women. The term originated after Rebecca Solnit wrote an essay about a conversation she had with a man, in which he explained a book she actually wrote. The best examples include your run of the mill obvious mansplain, like this: “I recently met a dude who spent half an hour explaining to me how Spanish dialects work. This was right after I had told him that I grew up in Spain. He had taken Spanish for one year in high school, 20 years ago.” And it is not only on social media,
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it’s in real life like this: “Brand new employee came in on his first day and tried to tell me how to do the job that I was training him for, then bitched to our boss that I was training him wrong (still on the first day btw). The manager told the new guy to take over for the day since I obviously didn’t know how to do my job and I was given a paid day off by my manager. Came in the next day to find the guy had quit.”

Epic jargon, dude A reader with an interest in newly created words joining the English language notices a recently coined corporate favourite: outplacement. It replaces “made redundant” or “fired”. Do you know anymore?

“A recent trip to Hamilton found us eating in a restaurant with a fabulous menu (for people with strong stomachs!) My husband recommends the Happy Farmers in the Pot, they were euphoric!” exclaims Deborah.
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Second even if you already had the flu this season, you could pick up a different virus strain and get sick again. What’s mostly been going around has been influenza A H3N2, but some H1N1 and influenza B strains are circulating to a lesser extent and could pick up more steam in the weeks ahead.

Third, flu may be taking a heavier toll in this area of the state.

Among seven regions of Illinois, the Champaign region was second highest in the percentage of outpatient visits connected with flu like illness, according to the latest update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the week ended Jan. 20. Flu like illness is defined as a fever over 100 degrees.

That same Illinois report also showed an upward swing in doctor’s office visits for flu symptoms in the ages 5 24 group, though people older than 65 still accounted for the most admissions to hospital intensive care units for flu.

Medical staff members at both Carle and Christie Clinic said they’ve continued to see a steady stream of patients with flu symptoms, and one doctor said flu has even picked up recently.

“Starting about a week and a half ago, we had an uptick in our flu, and it’s been pretty constant,” said Dr. Mitch Hammel,
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a family medicine doctor at Christie Clinic in Monticello.

While many earlier flu cases involved people who hadn’t gotten flu shots, the recent influx has also included many vaccinated people, he said.

If you’re reconsidering the flu shot, know it will take about two weeks for its effectiveness to kick in. And this year’s vaccine has been about 10 30 percent effective compared with 40 60 percent effective on years when the vaccine is considered to be a good match to the strains that are circulating.

But even a less effective vaccine will offer some protection, according to Toni Kerney, a nurse who coordinates Carle’s community flu clinics.

“The flu vaccine is never a perfect match, but it’s a cousin of what’s going around, so what it does is it lessens the severity of any illnesses you can get,” she said.

Kerney and others continue to advise getting a flu shot, even this late in the season. And continue observing the usual protective measures, including frequent hand washing and staying home if you’re sick,
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Ten days earlier, Joe and Diane Philbin had buried their 21 year old son, Michael, following his accidental drowning in the icy Fox River in Oshkosh, Wis. on Jan. 8,
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the night after Philbin interviewed for the Miami job. A security guard heard someone yelling for help, and called police. The body was recovered the following afternoon. Investigators believe he stumbled into the river and couldn’t get out.

The family heartaches have given Philbin a greater perspective on life and the NFL. It is evident in his mild mannered demeanor and ability to make decisions without being rattled. Choosing a starting quarterback? Small potatoes. This is a man who took on a high profile, high pressure job in the midst of a horrible tragedy, when other people would have crumpled and wanted to hide. At the same time he was helping his wounded family adjust to a new life, he was in the throes of the NFL draft and the start of training camp.
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They used Monopoly boards to conceal maps of Nazi Germany, and rubber stamps for travel permits were fashioned from boot heels. Entire camps dedicated themselves to digging tunnels, tailoring disguises and bribing guards for train timetables with one sole aim: escape.

They used Monopoly boards to conceal maps of Nazi Germany, and rubber stamps for travel permits were fashioned from boot heels. Entire camps dedicated themselves to digging tunnels, tailoring disguises and bribing guards for train timetables with one sole aim: escape.

If the telling of acts of defiance such as the escapes from Colditz Castle were left to Hollywood, history would record that Allied prisoners of war enjoyed one long game of cat and mouse with their Nazi guards, planning and plotting in perfect harmony before scurrying through tunnels and taking a short train ride to freedom in Switzerland or Sweden while their colleagues performed Gilbert and Sullivan songs to distract the guards.

Yesterday, more than 50 veterans from the camps gathered at the Imperial War Museum in London to present a very different picture of life in captivity and the sacrifices that were made to return just a handful of the tens of thousands of Allied prisoners of war back home.

The gathering coincided with the launch a new exhibition at the museum, Great Escapes, designed to explode the myths of cinematic portrayals of escape efforts made in camps from Italy to Lithuania and underline the extraordinary ingenuity of the soldiers, sailors and airmen whose primary struggle in captivity was often not the pursuit of freedom but the avoidance of starvation.

For millions, Hut Four in Stalag Luft III is better known as the wooden shack where some 80 prisoners crawled their way towards freedom on 24 March 1944 through “Harry”, a 104 metre tunnel dug over five months with the aid of 650 servicemen held in the camp’s north compound. The mass break out was the basis for

The Great Escape, the 1963 film starring Steve McQueen, Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson and Donald Pleasance which has become the most iconic of the escape films.

But for Frank Stone, an 18 year old Royal Air Force gunner whose Hampden bomber crash landed in Germany in 1940, Hut Four yesterday represented an austere home whose occupants lived in constant fear of discovery and where boredom as much as duty made escape worth pursuing.

Mr Stone, 82, a retired civil servant from Derby, said: “We really did not have much to do in the camp. It was a very dull life Stalag Luft III was a bleak place in a pine forest. In winter it was bitterly cold, you had to scrimp together every bit of clothing.

“It was only the escape effort that made life interesting. That’s why a lot of us were involved. You were always terrified the Germans were going to burst in and find us. I had to try and disguise all the dirt that was coming out of the tunnel and getting on the floor of the hut. We had to scrub the floorboards to wash it off. The Germans could never understand why we were washing all the time and told us to stop. But we explained that our commanding officer was a Royal Navy man who liked to keep his decks clean. They seemed to accept that.”

Located near Sagan, a Polish town incorporated into the Third Reich, Stalag Luft III held 10,000 PoWs at its height and was built to be one of the most escape proof and well equipped of the Stammlager Luftwaffe, a network of camps built on the orders of Hermann Goering, the head of the German air force, to house captured airmen.

It was nearly 400 miles from Switzerland and almost 200 miles from the Baltic ports leading to neutral Sweden. Escape was therefore extremely difficult. Of the 10,000 RAF members taken prisoner during the war, only 30 ever escaped back to Britain.

Arthur Cole, 84, another RAF serviceman, who was based in Hut Five and on a reserve list to escape on 24 March, said: “This business of it being our duty to escape has been greatly exaggerated. There were 2,500 men in our compound alone. If we had all tried to escape then it would have been absolute chaos.

“In fact, escaping was banned unless you could come up with a credible plan and it was approved by the X Organisation, the escape committee. So although everybody thought about it, there were only a small number of active plans.

“We tried to amuse ourselves, mostly by playing cards. The Germans made a big fuss about how they had provided a golf course and clubs in this model camp of theirs. It turned out to be two broken putters and holes made from Red Cross tins sunk in sand. There wasn’t a blade of grass in the place.”

Although the Great Escape film recorded the fact that 50 of the 74 prisoners who were recaptured were executed on the orders of Hitler, many of the veterans gathered yesterday remembered a slower war of attrition designed to break their physical and mental resolve, which has gone largely unrecorded.

From Colditz Castle, the high security prison where repeat escapees were incarcerated, to the dozens of lesser known camps dotted around southern Germany and the Baltic countries, German policy was to observe only the most basic standards laid down under the 1929 Geneva Convention, which governed treatment of PoWs.

Rations in most of the camps were meagre, mainly consisting of thin soup. As a result many prisoners relied on Red Cross parcels to maintain their strength.

In one camp, the men were made to puncture each tin with a hammer to ensure they could not be strung together as air ducts in tunnels. The measure meant that the food in the tins often rotted before it could be consumed.

One veteran, incarcerated in Lithuania towards the end of the war, said: “I used to wake up with stomach cramps because of the cold and hunger. I got dysentery because what food we did get was filthy. I’m afraid it wasn’t all putting on plays and hiding soil in the vegetable patches. It was a grim existence.”

Then as the Nazi regime began to lose the war, the PoWs became an increased burden. In January 1945, the occupants of Stalag Luft III were forced to walk 60 miles in three days, killing several dozen prisoners.

John Leakey, 83, an RAF gunner, was in the same Hampden bomber as Mr Stone when it crashed, and pulled his comrade from the burning wreckage of the plane as its ammunition began to explode. Until yesterday, they had not met since that night after being sent to different camps.

Mr Leakey, originally from Kennington, close to the Imperial War Museum in south London, explained how the two men ended up with very different experiences as prisoners after he escaped by disguising himself as a French enforced labourer.

He said: “I managed to break away during a route march and when we were recaptured I persuaded the Germans I was a French worker. They took me in and shared their food. To me it was fantastic cheese, bread, meat, vegetables. It made me realise how pitiful what we were given to eat in the camps had been.”

Despite the often severe conditions, the exhibition, to run from 14 October until 31 July, pays tribute to the creativity of the prisoners in their efforts to burrow, bluff and even fly their way to liberty.
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MADISON (WKOW) These days making music isn’t just good for the heart and soul; it’s good for the lungs.Pulmonary rehab patients at SSM Health in Madison are using harmonicas as part of their therapy. “It helps them slow down their breathing and breathe against the resistance, which is like weight lifting for their lungs,” said Mary Wichern, a cardio pulmonary team member. “It really helps them to breathe more efficiently.”We caught up with patient James Lindemann. It was his first day using the harmonica in a therapy class. “I thought it was sort of neat because I like music,” he said. “It grabs you because it’s something I like to do.”Wichern told 27 News,
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the harmonica hasn’t been just fun; it’s proven to be effective. “It increases the flexibility of the airways, so that the elasticity of the airways gets stronger.”SSM Health started using the harmonica therapy in November. It’s based on similar programs across the country.Wichern said harmonicas can also be beneficial for cardiac patients and patients with memory loss.Most Popular StoriesMost Popular StoriesMore>>Beloit PD seek Woodman’s hit and run suspectBeloit PD seek Woodman’s hit and run suspectBeloit Police are trying to identify a suspect in a hit and run that happened Saturday around 3:00 in the afternoon.Beloit Police are trying to identify a suspect in a hit and run that happened Saturday around 3:00 in the afternoon.Madison Police clock a car going 120+ mph on the BeltlineMadison Police clock a car going 120+ mph on the BeltlineCourtesy: Madison Police Dept.Courtesy: Madison Police Dept.Madison Police say a car was going more than 120mph on the Beltline early Saturday morning.Madison Police say a car was going more than 120mph on the Beltline early Saturday morning.One dead, three hospitalized after Cross Plains crashOne dead, three hospitalized after Cross Plains crashDane County officials say the driver of a Ford Taurus died Friday afternoon after his car collided with a Toyota Prius near Cross Plains.Dane County officials say the driver of a Ford Taurus died Friday afternoon after his car collided with a Toyota Prius near Cross Plains.Sen. Ron Johnson weighs in on DOJ announcement to ban bump stocksSen. Ron Johnson weighs in on DOJ announcement to ban bump stocksThe Trump administration is taking its first step on gun control. The Department of Justice (DOJ) formally submitted a new regulation Saturday to ban bump stocks, the modifications that can amp up a gun’s firing capability.
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I’ve read to string a row of fishing line around the plants and then to string one lower down around the plants. The deer will learn not to go to your house because they can’t see what is stopping them from their treats. I don’t know if this works or not just read it recently. If it doesn’t work, try buying a big jar of jalapeno peppers and grind them up in the blender or food processor with the juice. Spread it all around the plants. It won’t hurt any plants and it keeps the cats away from us. They don’t like the smell and don’t get close enough for it to harm them. Perhaps it will work with deer also.

Homemade Spray for Rose Bushes

Mix a capful of ammonia in a gallon of water then put into a spray bottle. This will kill the bugs on your rose bushes and make the roses bloom more healthily.

By Kelly from Bend, OREmail to a FriendLinkRate It:

Growing Strawberries In A Wheelbarrow

If you love strawberries I have found that the best place to grow them so nothing eats them and they get the best sun all day is in an old wheelbarrow. The strawberries stay clean, they can live on the back verandah or wherever you can keep an eye on the birds etc. It’s also easy to keep the ants away from them. My grandchildren love to come and pick strawberries from my ‘special’ wheelbarrow of sweetness.
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He was always well known for his running ability, generally from the police at the time.

It was one of those police officers that finally sat Firth down to discuss turning his remarkable ability toward a healthier direction.

He was directed to Vancouver running clubs and a couple of years later, Firth’s alter ego, “Caribou Legs” would be borne out of the healing that focused running gave him.

“Caribou Leg” is an old style message runner of his people Gwich’in.

During a previous run, Firth lost his sister in a domestic violence incident and he wanted to honour her in the best way he knew how running.

And this run isn’t without adversity either when you realize he is running alone, without any on road support.

It’s just him, a backpack and his hand drum, and daily phone and social media contact with his quarterback in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia Robyn Lawson.

All funding for his running, surviving and educating needs are provided for via donations, speaking honorariums and a crowd funding page.

He covers an average of 60 to 75 kilometres a day and sometimes as much as 100 kilometres in a day.

At times he’s had to run several kilometres without water, he has had to sleep in broken and abandoned vehicles, barns, under boards at the side of the highway, and even a culvert will do.

He was always well known for his running ability, generally from the police at the time.

It was one of those police officers that finally sat Firth down to discuss turning his remarkable ability toward a healthier direction.

He was directed to Vancouver running clubs and a couple of years later, Firth’s alter ego, “Caribou Legs” would be borne out of the healing that focused running gave him.

“Caribou Leg” is an old style message runner of his people Gwich’in.

During a previous run, Firth lost his sister in a domestic violence incident and he wanted to honour her in the best way he knew how running.

And this run isn’t without adversity either when you realize he is running alone, without any on road support.

It’s just him, a backpack and his hand drum, and daily phone and social media contact with his quarterback in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia Robyn Lawson.

All funding for his running, surviving and educating needs are provided for via donations, speaking honorariums and a crowd funding page.

He covers an average of 60 to 75 kilometres a day and sometimes as much as 100 kilometres in a day.

At times he’s had to run several kilometres without water, he has had to sleep in broken and abandoned vehicles, barns, under boards at the side of the highway, and even a culvert will do.
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Our urban trees, I submit, should be valued like any other urban infrastructure. Storm water sewers, clean water, fire hydrants, fire departments, police services and schools, to name a few, would be in good company with trees. Living in a city without trees would be paramount to living in a concrete desert. I say, let’s put them on the table when we talk about infrastructure.

Value of Trees

If you are still not convinced of the value of trees, consider the monetary cost of not having them. According to a recent press release from Davey Tree, there are at least four ways that trees ‘mean money’:

Trees increase property values. A tree increases a homes value by more than $7,000. That may not sound like much if your fully detached abode is worth a couple million, but this is an American so you would be within your rights to add some value to it.

Trees reduce energy bills. Strategically placed trees can save up to 56 percent on annual air conditioning costs. Good to know as we push up against the summer weather. Someone be sure to tell the provincial government about this one.

Planted on the west side of your home, evergreen trees can reduce the cooling impact of westerly winds during winter, saving heating costs.

Trees Sell homes. The presence of street trees reduces time on the market by an average of 1.7 days. Ok, in this market of high turnover house sales, you may not be impressed. But I think you get the point.

Trees give back. Over a span of 50 years, one tree produces $31,250 worth of oxygen, provides $62,000 worth of pollution control, recycles $37,500 worth of water and controls $31,250 worth of soil erosion (all $ American). Total value: $162, 000. Not a bad net worth for a 50 year old. And the benefits just continue to accrue as the tree ages.

Michelle Sawka, project manager of the Green Infrastructure Ontario coalition says, “We have to convince people that nature is an asset and that it provides services. We need to integrate the natural environment into our cities and manage it the same way as we manage our roads and pipes.” Sawka is talking about trees
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